2001-02 Pest Management Grant Summaries

Back to 1995-2002 Pest Management Grants Program

Applicants submitted 26 proposals requesting funding under the Department of Pesticide Regulation's (DPR) Pest Management Grants program for FY 2001/2002. The Pest Management Advisory Committee (PMAC) evaluated all complete proposals and by consensus, recommended 11 projects be funded for a total of $338,695. The Director of the Department of Pesticide Regulation approved these recommendations and the funding of these projects.

Demonstration Projects

Demonstration Projects

Project Title Applicant Location Budget
Kids in Gardens Ms. Tamara Shulman-Aquatic Outreach Institute

Alameda, Contra Costa, and San Francisco counties $30,000

Summary: The Aquatic Outreach Institute (AOI), a non-profit environmental education organization, develops and manages education and outreach programs on creeks, wetlands, and watersheds in the San Francisco Bay Area. These programs provide thousands of school children, educators, and the general public with information about aquatic resources. In the third year of funding from DPR, AOI will continue with its highly successful train-the-trainer program, Kids in Gardens, which will educate 90 kindergarten-through-twelfth-grade teachers on ways they can educate their students about reducing the use of hazardous pesticides. Teachers will involve 6,000 students in IPM school gardening projects. Students will also educate their families and community members about IPM gardening practices. More than 6,500 family and community members will receive student-generated information on IPM in the form of surveys, fliers, artwork, and web pages. Creating school gardens in California has become a high priority for school administrators; using these gardens as outdoor laboratories for students presents an excellent opportunity to combine IPM practices with lessons teachers are already teaching, and to extend this learning to students' families.


Project Title Applicant Location Budget
Reduced-Risk Vineyard Practices-Demonstration and Outreach by the Central Coast Vineyard Team Ms. Kris O'Connor-Central Coast Vineyard Team
San Luis Obispo, Santa Cruz, Santa Barbara, & Monterey counties $30,000

Summary: Wine grape acreage in the Central Coast region is increasing rapidly. The Central Coast Vineyard Team (CCVT) is a grower group, managing over 30,000 acres of winegrapes, that promotes sustainable vineyard practices on the Central Coast. The group developed the Positive Points System (PPS) for measuring growers' progress. The PPS represents a model vineyard that integrates soil, water, pest, and viticultural practices into a balanced biological system. Since 1996, the CCVT has worked on refining the PPS as an assessment tool within the region. This CCVT uses the tool as the foundation for a demonstration and grower-to-grower outreach effort that will target a significant number of new growers on the Central Coast and in other winegrape regions. During the first year of the project, the CCVT held field days with over 300 attendees representing approximately 83,000 acres of Central Coast winegrapes. Of these, nearly 20 percent were female or Hispanic, or other traditionally underrepresented groups. CCVT's first Spanish-speaking tailgate meeting attracted 24 vineyard foremen. Information was also disseminated to growers through a quarterly newsletter, local industry publications, and an educational web site (www.vineyardteam.org). This year, the group will evaluate the adoption of reduced-risk practices and create a custom database to facilitate analysis of the data. CCVT will continue to assist regional groups in use of the PPS.


Project Title Applicant Location Budget
Aerial Release of Trichogramma to Control Codling Moth Mr. Russell Stocker-ARENA Pesticide Management Butte, Contra Costa, Kings, San Joaquin, Sutter, Tehama & Tulare counties $18,350

Summary: Using pheromone mating disruption and releasing tiny, parasitic Trichogramma wasps can significantly reduce damage from codling moth, a key pest of California walnuts. Work done from 1998 to 2001 demonstrated the technical success of metering and aerially applying Trichogramma-parasitized grain moth eggs to the foliage of walnut trees. The work was done in conjunction with the Walnut Pest Management Alliance. During the fourth year of this project, the researcher will aerially apply pheromones during the first and second codling moth generations, and release Trichogramma parasitoids during the third generation. In cooperation with the Walnut Alliance, the goal is to demonstrate these practices on commercial walnut acreage, and to encourage adoption by growers.


Project Title  Applicant Location Budget
Model Regional Integrated Pest Management Coalition Mr. Phil Boise-Community Environmental Council Santa Barbara County $49,990

Summary: Many groups within Santa Barbara County are independently developing reduced-risk pest management programs. This new project will bring together these groups by developing a Model Regional IPM Coalition to address their many objectives collaboratively. The regional IPM coalition includes public agencies, school districts, parks, public gardens, and non-profit environmental organizations. The coalition will produce area-specific IPM documents and provide training and technical assistance. The goal of the project is to improve pesticide use communication, provide pesticide education to the public, and create an exportable Regional IPM Implementation Plan that can assist other communities.


Project Title  Applicant Location Budget
Demonstration of Vineyard Floor Management Alternatives Mr. Richard Smith & Mr. Larry Bettiga-University of California Cooperative Extension Monterey County $23,897

Summary: Runoff of pesticides from agricultural lands is a key water quality concern along California's Central Coast and the offshore National Marine Sanctuary. Growers are under increasing pressure to adopt management practices that reduce runoff and associated sediment and pesticide loads. This project involves a management team that includes members of the Central Coast Vineyard Team, growers, UC farm advisers and specialists. The project will contrast conventional vineyard management practices with alternative strategies, such as cultivation, post-emergent herbicides, and new generation pre-emergent herbicides. Winter cover crops, which have been shown to decrease runoff, will be planted in the reduced-risk plots. The researchers will analyze costs of the alternative strategies. Results of the project will be presented to growers through field days, grower meetings, newsletters, trade journals and a web site.


Project Title  Applicant Location Budget
Multi-Disciplinary Pest Management in a Museum Setting Mr. James Bryant-Riverside Municipal Museum Riverside County $39,059

Summary: Museums must protect their collections from pests; in the past, this frequently meant using highly toxic pesticides such as arsenic and naphthalene. For this new project, the Riverside Municipal Museum will document its use of IPM practices and collaborate with other city agencies to provide a model IPM program for other museums and city departments in Southern California. The Museum currently uses pheromone traps, monitors for pests, avoids creating harborage, and maintains structural integrity. The project will expand and upgrade current IPM practices at the Museum, and through demonstrations and displays, will heighten public awareness of IPM.