Alliance Projects Funded in 2002

Back to Pest Management Alliance Evaluations and Project Summaries

  • ALMOND PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE
Almond Board of California-Ms. Chris Heintz
Butte, Stanislaus, & Kern counties
1998: $99,000; 1999: $98,976; 2000: $98,756; 2001: $100,000; 2002: $79,487

California is the only state in North America that commercially produces almonds. Approximately 6,000 growers in the state produce three-quarters of the world's almonds on about 600,000 acres extending from Chico to Bakersfield. Almond growers currently rely primarily on organophosphate and pyrethroid insecticides to control the crop's key pests, the navel orange worm and peach twig borer. The Almond Alliance, composed of growers, UC researchers, and pest control advisers, was formed in 1998 to evaluate and demonstrate least-disruptive pest management practices. Three field sites have been established in Butte, Stanislaus, and Kern counties to demonstrate alternatives to dormant organophosphates to control peach twig borer, the benefits of winter orchard sanitation to control navel orange worm, and monitoring techniques to accurately identify pests, beneficial insects, and plant diseases. Several regional field days during the dormant season and growing season have attracted over 1,000 growers and pest control advisers. Organophosphate pesticide use in almonds has declined each year from 1998, the year the project began, through 2000.

  • THE CALIFORNIA WINEGRAPE PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE
California Association of Winegrape Growers-Ms. Karen Ross Napa, Sonoma, Mendocino, Alameda, Monterey, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Riverside, Stanislaus, and San Joaquin counties
2000: $99,380; 2001: $99,894; 2002: $79,487

Winegrapes are grown on more than 427,000 acres by 4,400 growers in 42 of California's 58 counties. Two key pest management issues in this crop are the human health problems associated with sulfur drift and herbicides such as oxyfluorfen, simazine, and gramoxone. Herbicides such as simazine and diuron also pose risks to surface and groundwater. In its third year, the Winegrape Alliance will continue to address these two issues through a combination of demonstration and outreach. Composed of growers from all winegrape-growing regions of the state and coordinated by the California Association of Winegrape Growers, the Alliance team will demonstrate reduced-risk vineyard practices on a region-by-region basis. This project will speed the adoption of reduced-risk pest management among California's winegrape growers, promoting sustainable practices within the $1.89 billion winegrape industry.

  • PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE: PESTICIDE RISK-REDUCTION IN CALIFORNIA PRUNES
California Dried Plum Board-Mr. Gary Obenauf
Tehama, Butte, Glenn, Yuba, Sutter, Yolo, Merced, Madera, Fresno and Tulare counties
1998: $50,000; 1999: $92,727; 2001: $100,000; 2002: $79,487

California's 1,400 prune growers produce about 200,000 dried tons annually on 86,000 acres, or 99 percent of all prunes nationwide. The Prune Alliance was established in 1998 to expand and strengthen existing efforts to implement reduced-risk pest management practices. As this project continues for the fourth year, the Alliance team plans to reduce organophosphate use by prune growers, improve monitoring for disease, demonstrate the use of cover crops for reducing pesticide runoff, and reduce the impacts of pest management practices on surface and groundwater by improving irrigation management. The key insect pest, peach twig borer, is often managed with dormant applications of organophosphate insecticides. Cooperating growers have established thirty-four demonstration orchards throughout the state. At each site, growers replaced organophosphates with a dormant oil spray or through in-season treatments of Bacillus thuringiensis. At six of these sites, researchers will compare conventional and reduced-risk practices.

  • PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE WORKPLAN FOR CALIFORNIA WALNUTS
Walnut Marketing Board-Mr. Dennis Balint
Tehama, Butte, Yuba, Sutter, Yolo/Solano, Contra Costa, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Kings & Tulare counties
1998: $100,000; 1999: $65,750; 2000: $100,000; 2001: $100,000; 2002: $79,487

The Walnut Alliance was established in 1998 by the Walnut Marketing Board to evaluate and demonstrate commercial walnut production using reduced-risk pest management practices. In 2001 the Alliance successfully (1) demonstrated the use of an emerging sprayable pheromone technology for codling moth, (2) field-tested walnut bud sampling methods, eradicant sprays, and a forecasting model for blight control, and (3) demonstrated the value of cover crops for control of winter weeds. During its fifth year, the Alliance will increase grower adoption of cost-effective reduced-risk alternatives. A primary goal is to convert 25 percent of the state's walnut acreage from use of conventional insecticides to sprayable pheromone within the next two years. In a parallel project with the Center for Agricultural Partnerships, pest control advisers will refine and demonstrate monitoring techniques for codling moth. The Alliance will also partner with the Nature Conservancy to demonstrate reduced-risk practices on Conservancy orchards in Tehama County. The Alliance team will promote a 75 percent reduction of organophosphate and pyrethroid use on the 100,000 acres of walnuts sprayed for codling moth through widespread use of sprayable pheromone.

  • PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE FOR THE CONTAINERIZED NURSERY INDUSTRY
University of California-Dr. Heather S. Costa
Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles and San Diego counties
2000: $67,849; 2001: $75,961; 2002: $79,058

In 1999, the red imported fire ant was found in Southern California and all nurseries in Orange County were placed under quarantine. As a result, growers transporting nursery products must use selected pesticides to meet quarantine requirements for this introduced pest and the glassy-winged sharpshooter, another new pest. This has resulted in organophosphate pesticide use 70 times above normal in Orange County alone. The impact is increased potential for movement of pesticides into surface water and greater likelihood of worker exposure. Now in its third year, the Alliance for the containerized nursery industry, is made up of industry representatives, University of California researchers, and government agencies. During the past two years, Alliance researchers demonstrated monitoring and treatment practices such as bait application as viable reduced-risk alternatives. Use of vegetative buffer strips, sediment reduction techniques, and water recapture systems have been demonstrated as successful practices to limit offsite movement of pesticides. The Alliance proposes to continue and expand this demonstration work. Information about the Alliance and reduced-risk strategies will be available electronically via the California Association of Nurserymen web site, www.can-online.org.

  • DEVELOPMENT OF AN INTEGRATED SYSTEM FOR CONTROLLING SAN JOSE SCALE, PEACH TWIG BORER, ORIENTAL FRUIT MOTH, KATYDID, AND WESTERN FLOWER THRIPS IN CLINGSTONE CANNING AND FRESTH SHIPPING PEACHES, PLUMS AND NECTARINES
California Tree Fruit Agreement-Mr. Jonathan Field
Tulare, Kings, Fresno, Sutter, and Yuba counties
2000: $51,251; 2001: $89,425; 2002: $79,264

Organophosphate and carbamate insecticides account for most of the pesticide applications to stone fruit crops. Now in its third year, the Stone Fruit Alliance will continue to compare conventional with reduced-risk pest management practices. In addition, team members will study and document the biology of stone fruit pests and determine how reduced-risk materials fit into a pest management program. The project will (1) continue to demonstrate the efficacy and economics of reduced-risk practices in grower demonstration sites; (2) continue to assess the population dynamics of San Jose scale and its natural enemies; (3) screen the efficacy of horticultural oils and reduced-risk insect growth regulators on various stages of scale; (4) study secondary pests arising in certain environments due to the use of reduced-risk practices; and (5) provide grower-pest control adviser education and outreach through field demonstrations, meetings, publications, and internet resources.

  • MODEL INTEGRATED PEST MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR SCHOOLS
Marin County Department of Agriculture & Marin County Office of Education-Mr. Stacy Carlsen
Marin, Solano, Contra Costa, and Alameda counties
2000: $50,000; 2001: $50,000; 2002: $79,487

Schools in California face many challenges educating children, including the use of pesticides in schoolrooms and on school grounds. With the growing concern about pesticide use and passage of the Healthy Schools Act, many school districts have begun to adopt IPM practices, but lack adequate information and training. During the first year of the School IPM Alliance, IPM experts conducted site assessments in three Marin County schools that were used for specialized training of facility managers. Successful IPM practices were shared among school districts in Northern California. As the project continues for a second year, agricultural commissioners from Marin, Madera, Solano, Contra Costa, and Alameda counties will team up to help implement IPM practices in their county's school districts. In Marin County, team members will initiate a pilot project to demonstrate and teach landscape IPM monitoring and record keeping as a model for districts elsewhere.

  • SOUTHERN SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY CITRUS PEST MANAGEMENT ALLIANCE
California Citrus Research Board-Mr. Ted Batkin
Tulare and Kern counties
2001: $100,000; 2002: $79,487

In Southern California, two key pests of citrus, the citrus thrips and California red scale, can be managed through biological control. However, the more extreme environmental conditions in the San Joaquin Valley interfere with effective biological control, and growers usually rely upon inexpensive, readily available organophosphate and carbamate insecticides. As citrus thrips and California red scale develop resistance to these insecticides, growers have substituted reduced-risk insecticides. These replacements are not without problems. Esteem®, an insect growth regulator, is quite toxic to the vedalia beetle, essential for control of cottony cushion scale. In addition, thrips and scale will eventually develop resistance to these new insecticides as well. Thus, the need to promote biological control in the Valley is critical. During the first year of the Citrus Alliance, twenty demonstration orchards were established in Tulare and Kern counties to compare a conventional insecticide program with an intermediate and IPM approach. Researchers raised vedalia beetles to use in orchards that had outbreaks of cottony cushion scale. In the second year, the Alliance team will continue to teach IPM practices to growers and pest control advisers in the southern San Joaquin Valley. Participating growers will also demonstrate improved pest monitoring and spray timing, reduced pesticide applications, and reduced-risk herbicide practices, including changes in irrigation and reducing herbicide use between tree rows.