California Code of Regulations (Title 3. Food and Agriculture)
Division 6. Pesticides and Pest Control Operations

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Division 6. Pesticides and Pest Control Operations
Chapter 3. Pest Control Operations
Subchapter 3. Pesticide Worker Safety
Article 2. General Safety Requirements


6720. Safety of Employed Persons.

(a) The requirements of this article shall be complied with by the employer for the safety of employees handling pesticides.

(b) When only vertebrate pest control baits, solid fumigants (including aluminum phosphide, magnesium phosphide, and smoke cartridges), insect monitoring traps or non-insecticidal lures are handled, the employer is exempt from the requirements of sections 6730 (Working Alone), 6732 (Change Area), and 6736 (Coveralls).

(c) When antimicrobial agents, used only as sanitizers, disinfectants, or medical sterilants, or pool and spa chemicals are handled, the employer is exempt from complying with the provisions of Title 3, California Code of Regulations sections specified below, provided the employer instead complies with any applicable requirements in the following corresponding provisions of Title 8, California Code of Regulations.

 

Title 3, CCR Title 8, CCR
6700 3200 and 3202
6702 3200 and 3203
6720 As indicated in this Subsection
6723 3203, 3204, and 5194
6724 3203 and 5194
6726 3400
6732 3367
6734 3363 and 3366
6736 3383
6738 3380 through 3385
6739 5144
6740 3317
6742 5141
6744 3203 and 5194

(d) The provisions of Sections 6734 and 6768 (Decontamination), 6726 and 6766 (Emergency Medical Care), 6736 (Coveralls), 6738(b)-(h) (Personal Protective Equipment), 6739 (Respiratory Protection) and 6770 (Field Reentry) do not apply to licensed agricultural pest control advisers and registered professional foresters, or employees under their direct supervision, while performing, after the application is completed, crop adviser tasks, including field-checking or scouting, making observations of the well-being of the plants, or taking samples provided:

(1) They have been trained equivalent to the requirements of Section 6724 (licensed agricultural pest control advisers are considered trained for the purposes of this exception); and

(2) The licensed agricultural pest control adviser or registered professional forester responsible for the direct supervision has:

(A) Made specific determinations regarding appropriate personal protective equipment, needed decontamination facilities, and how to safely conduct crop adviser tasks;

(B) Informed each employee under his or her direct supervision of the pesticide product and active ingredient(s) applied, method and time of application, the restricted entry interval, and determinations made pursuant to (A) above; and

(C) Instructed each employee under his or her direct supervision regarding which tasks to perform and how to contact him or her if the need arises.

(e) The provisions of this subchapter do not apply to employees handling consumer products packaged for distribution to, and use by, the general public, provided that employee use of the product is not significantly greater than the typical consumer use of the product.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 11501, 12973, 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6722. Age.

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 407 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

6723. Hazard Communication for Pesticide Handlers.

(a) Before employees are allowed to handle pesticides, the employer shall display a copy of a completed written Hazard Communication Information for Employees Handling Pesticides in Agricultural Settings (Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflet A-8) or Hazard Communication Information for Employees Handling Pesticides in Noncrop Settings (Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflet N-8), as applicable, at a central location in the workplace. Upon request, the employer shall read to the requesting employee, in a language understandable to that employee, Pesticide Information Series leaflet A-8/N-8. Pesticide Information Series leaflet A-8/N-8 shall be written by the Department of Pesticide Regulation in English and Spanish. Pesticide Information Series leaflets are available from the department.

(b) The employer shall maintain, at a central location at the workplace accessible to employees who handle pesticides the following: 

(1) Pesticide use records as specified in Section 6624 (b), (c), and (e) for pesticides that have been handled by his or her employees;

(2) Copies of available Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflets which are applicable to the pesticides and handling activities listed in the pesticide use records referred to in subsection (b) (1); and

(3) A Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), as specified by Title 8 California Code of Regulations, Section 5194, for each pesticide listed in the pesticide use records referred to in subsection (b) (1). If the MSDS is not provided by the registrant of a pesticide, the employer shall:

(A) Within seven working days of a request for a MSDS from an employee, employee representative or employee’s physician, make written inquiry to the registrant of the pesticide, asking that a MSDS be sent to the employer. If the employer has made written inquiry within the last twelve months as to whether the pesticide is subject to the requirement for a MSDS or the employer has made a written inquiry within the last six months requesting new, revised or later information on the MSDS, the employer need not make additional written inquiry. A copy of the written inquiry shall immediately be sent to the person requesting the MSDS;

(B) Notify the requester of the availability of the MSDS or provide a copy of the MSDS to the requester within fifteen days of receipt of the MSDS from the registrant; and

(C) If a response has not been received from the registrant within twenty-five working days of the date the inquiry was made, send the department a copy of the inquiry with a notation that no response has been received. The employer is not precluded from obtaining and providing the MSDS utilizing other more expedient methods in lieu of those provided in this subsection.

(c) The employer shall inform employees, before they are allowed to handle pesticides and at least annually thereafter, of the location and availability of the records and other documents listed in this Section or relating to employee training, monitoring, and potential exposure. If the location of the records and other documents changes, an employer shall promptly inform his or her employees of the new location.

(d) The employer shall provide, upon request of his or her employee, employee representative, or employee’s physician, access to any records or other documents required to be maintained pursuant to this chapter. Access shall be granted as soon as possible and not to exceed forty-eight hours from the date of the request. 

INFORMATIONAL NOTE: Other requirements relating to hazard communication can be found in Sections 6602, 6618, 6619, 6724, 6726, 6738, 6744, 6764, 6766, 6770, and 6776.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12980, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code; and 29 Code of Federal Regulations, Part 1910.1200.

 

6723.1. Application-Specific Information For Handlers.

(a) The operator of property used for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity shall display, at a central location, the following application-specific information while employees are employed to handle pesticides:

(1) Identification of the treated area;

(2) Time and date of the application;

(3) Restricted entry interval; and

(4) Product name, EPA registration number, and active ingredients.

(b) The information shall be displayed within 24 hours of the completion of an application and include all applications that have been made to any treated field on the agricultural establishment within 1/4 mile of where employees will be working. Once displayed, the information shall remain displayed until the area no longer meets the definition of a treated field or handler employees will no longer be on the establishment, whichever occurs earlier.

(c) The original or copies of documents otherwise required to be maintained by this chapter may be used to meet the requirements of this Section provided they contain the information required by this Section.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 11501, 12973, 12980, and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6724. Handler Training.

The employer shall assure that employees who handle pesticides have been trained pursuant to the requirements of this Section and that all other provisions of this Section have been complied with for employees who handle pesticides.

(a) The employer shall have a written training program. The training program shall describe the materials (e.g., study guides, pamphlets, pesticide product labeling, Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflets, Material Safety Data Sheets, slides, video tapes) and information that will be provided and used to train his or her employees and identify the person or firm that will provide the training. The training program shall address each of the subjects specified in subsection (b) that is applicable to the specific pesticide handling situation. The employer shall maintain a copy of the training program while in use and for two years after use, at a central location at the workplace.

(b) The training shall cover, for each pesticide or chemically similar group of pesticides, to be used:

(1) Format and meaning of information, such as precautionary statements about human health hazards, contained in pesticide product labeling;

(2) Hazards of pesticides, including acute and chronic effects, delayed effects, and sensitization, as identified in pesticide product labeling, Material Safety Data Sheets, or Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflets;

(3) Routes by which pesticides can enter the body;

(4) Signs and symptoms of overexposure;

(5) Emergency first aid for pesticide overexposure;

(6) How to obtain emergency medical care;

(7) Routine and emergency decontamination procedures, including spill clean up and the need to thoroughly shower with soap and warm water after the exposure period;

(8) Need for, limitations, appropriate use, and sanitation, of, any required personal protective equipment;

(9) Prevention, recognition, and first aid for heat-related illness;

(10) Safety requirements and procedures, including engineering controls (such as closed systems and enclosed cabs) for handling, transporting, storing, and disposing of pesticides;

(11) Environmental concerns such as drift, runoff, and wildlife hazards;

(12) Warnings about taking pesticides or pesticide containers home;

(13) Requirements of this chapter and chapter 4 relating to pesticide safety, Material Safety Data Sheets, and Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflets;

(14) The purposes and requirements for medical supervision if organophosphate or carbamate pesticides with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" on the labeling are mixed, loaded, or applied for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity;

(15) The location of the written Hazard Communication Information For Employees Handling Pesticides (Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflet A-8), other Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflets, and Material Safety Data Sheets;

(16) The employee’s rights, including the right;

(A) To personally receive information about pesticides to which he or she may be exposed;

(B) For his or her physician or employee representative to receive information about pesticides to which he or she may be exposed; and

(C) To be protected against retaliatory action due to the exercise of any of his or her rights.

(c) The training shall be in a manner the employee can understand, be conducted pursuant to the written training program, and include response to questions.

(d) Training shall be completed before the employee is allowed to handle pesticides, continually updated to cover any new pesticides that will be handled, and repeated at least annually thereafter. Initial training may be waived if the employee submits a record showing that training meeting the requirements of this Section and covering the pesticides and use situations applicable to the new employment situation was received within the last year. A certified applicator is considered trained for the purposes of this Section.

(e) The date and extent of initial and annually required training given to the employee and the job to be assigned shall be recorded. This record shall be verified by the employee’s signature and retained by the employer for two years at a central location at the workplace accessible to employees.

(f) The person conducting the training for employees who will be handling pesticides for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity shall be qualified as one of the following:

(1) A California certified commercial applicator;

(2) A California certified private applicator;

(3) A person holding a valid County Biologist License in Pesticide Regulation or Investigation and Environmental Monitoring issued by the Department of Food and Agriculture;

(4) A farm advisor employed by the University of California Extension Office;

(5) A person who has completed an "instructor trainer" program presented by one of the following:

(A) the University of California, Integrated Pest Management Program after January 1, 1993; or

(B) other instructor training program approved by the Director;

(6) A California licensed Agricultural Pest Control Adviser;

(7) A California Registered Professional Forester; or

(8) Other trainer qualification approved by the Director.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6726. Emergency Medical Care.

(a) Emergency medical care for employees handling pesticides shall be planned for in advance. The employer shall locate a facility where emergency medical care is available for employees who will be handling pesticides.

(b) Employees shall be informed of the name and location of a facility where emergency medical care is available. The employer shall post in a prominent place at the work site, or work vehicle if there is no designated work site, the name, address and telephone number of a facility able to provide emergency medical care whenever employees will be handling pesticides and, if the identified facility is not reasonably accessible from that work location, procedures to be followed to obtain emergency medical care.

(c) When there is reasonable grounds to suspect that an employee has a pesticide illness, or when an exposure to a pesticide has occurred that might reasonably be expected to lead to an employee’s illness, the employer shall ensure that the employee is taken to a physician immediately.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6728. Medical Supervision.

(a) Whenever an employee mixes, loads, or applies a pesticide with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" that contains an organophosphate or carbamate, for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity, the employer shall maintain use records that identify the employee, the name of the pesticide, and the date of use. The original or copies of documents otherwise required to be maintained by this chapter may be used to meet the requirements of this Section provided they contain the information required by this Section.

(b) Each employer who has an employee who regularly handles pesticides specified in (a) shall have a written agreement signed by a physician, that includes the names and addresses of both the physician providing the medical supervision and the employer responsible for the employees, stating that the physician has agreed to provide medical supervision and that the physician possesses a copy of, and is aware of the contents of the document "Medical Supervision of Pesticide Workers-Guidelines for Physicians" (available from the Office of Environmental Health Hazard Assessment). A copy of this agreement shall be given to the commissioner by the employer no later than when an employee begins to regularly handle pesticides specified in (a).

(c) The employer’s responsibilities for medical supervision for employees regularly handling pesticides specified in (a) shall include the following: 

(1) All covered employees shall have baseline red cell and plasma cholinesterase determinations. Baseline values shall be verified every two years. For new employees, the medical supervisor may accept previously established baseline values if they are obtained in accordance with these regulations by the same laboratory methodology and are acceptable to the laboratory which will analyze the new employee’s blood samples.

(2)(A) The employer shall ensure that each employee, not previously under medical supervision associated with that employer, has red cell and plasma cholinesterase determinations within three working days after the conclusion of each 30-day period in which pesticides specified in (a) are regularly handled.

(B) After three tests at 30-day intervals, further periodic monitoring shall be at intervals specified in writing by the medical supervisor except for verification of baseline as specified in (1).

(C) Where the medical supervisor has made no written recommendation for continued periodic monitoring, the testing interval shall be 60 days.

(3) The employer shall keep a record of the agreement to provide medical supervision, use records, all recommendations received from the medical supervisor, and all results of cholinesterase tests required to be made on his/her employees by this Section or by the medical supervisor. Records required by this Section shall be maintained for three years and shall be available for inspection by the employee, the Director, commissioner, county health official, or state health official.

(4) The employer shall follow the recommendations of the medical supervisor concerning matters of occupational health.

(5) The employer shall post the name, address, and telephone number of the medical supervisor in a prominent place at the locale where the employee usually starts the workday; or if there is no locale where the employee usually starts the workday, at each worksite; or in each work vehicle.

(d) The employer shall investigate the work practices of any employee whose red cell or plasma cholinesterase levels fall below 80 percent of the baseline. The investigation of work practices shall include a review of the safety equipment used and its condition; and the employee’s work practices which included employee sanitation, pesticide handling procedures, and equipment usage. The employer shall maintain a written record of the findings, any changes in equipment or procedures, and any recommendations made to the employee.

(e) The employer shall remove an employee from exposure to organophosphate or carbamate pesticides if the employee’s plasma cholinesterase level falls to 60 percent or less of baseline, or if red cell cholinesterase falls to 70 percent or less of baseline. The employee shall be removed from further exposure until cholinesterase values return to 80 percent or more of their respective baseline values. The employer shall maintain written records of the dates of removal and the dates when employees are returned to exposure.

(f) To meet the requirements of these regulations, acetylcholinesterase (also known as red blood cell cholinesterase) and butyrylcholinesterase (also known as plasma or serum cholinesterase or pseudocholinesterase) tests ordered by a medical supervisor for occupational health surveillance shall be performed by a clinical laboratory currently approved by the State Department of Health Services to perform these tests. By January 1, 2000, tests shall be performed according to the procedures outlined below. If tests cannot be performed according to the following procedures, the conversion procedure outlined in 6728 (f)(8) shall be performed.

(1) Using personnel and procedures acceptable to the Department of Health Services (Business and Professions Code sections 1242,1243,1246,1269,2070; Health and Safety Code sections 120580, 1607), blood collection and storage shall be done according to the following conditions:

(A) Blood samples shall be kept in ice or at a temperature of 4º C until time of assay. If the sample is centrifuged to remove the erythrocytes from the plasma, the plasma shall be stored frozen at a temperature of minus 20º C until the assay is performed. If possible, the assay shall be performed within 24 hours after blood collection. Time of sample collection, analysis, and storage conditions shall be specified on the report.

(B) Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) or heparin shall be used as an anticoagulant in a standard vacutainer tube.

(2) The reagents and equipment shall conform to the following conditions:

(A) A spectrophotometer at a wavelength between 405 and 425 nanometers shall be used.

(B) The assay shall be performed at a temperature of 25º C.

(C) The following conditions regarding the buffer/chromogen shall apply:

1. A sodium phosphate buffer shall be used at a concentration of 0.1 M adjusted to a pH of 8.0 with a pH meter calibrated at both 7.0 and 10.0.

2. Dithiobisnitrobenzoic acid (DTNB) at a stock concentration of 9.7 mM in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer pH 7.0 shall be used.

(D) The substrate acetylthiocholine iodide shall be used at a stock concentration of
10.1 mM in 0.1 M sodium phosphate buffer pH 8.0.

(E) The butyrylcholinesterase inhibitor quinidine hydrochloride monohydrate shall be used at a stock concentration of 6 mM in distilled deionized water.

(3) The acetylcholinesterase enzyme assay shall be performed within 15 minutes of preparation and the procedure for performing the assay shall be as follows:

(A) Measure 0.2 mL whole blood and add into a 1.8 mL solution of deionized distilled water; mix thoroughly and keep the solution on ice.

(B) To 2.5 mL of the sodium phosphate buffer, add 0.02 mL of the blood solution,
0.1 mL of DTNB (0.32 mM final concentration) and 0.1 mL of quinidine (0.2 mM final concentration); mix thoroughly and allow to sit for 5 minutes.

(C) Add 0.3 mL acetylthiocholine iodide (1.0 mM final concentration) into the buffer/sample solution and mix thoroughly.

(D) Measure absorbance over the linear portion of the enzyme activity curve in the spectrophotometer.

(4) The procedure for performing butyrylcholinesterase enzyme assay determination shall be as follows:

(A) Physical separation of plasma or serum shall be performed.

(B) If samples are frozen, they shall be thawed at room temperature to assure homogeneity of the sample.

(C) To 2.6 mL of the sodium phosphate buffer, add 0.02 mL of the plasma or serum and 0.1 mL of DTNB (0.32 mM final concentration), mix thoroughly and allow to sit for 5 minutes.

(D) Add 0.3 mL acetylthiocholine iodide (1.0 mM final concentration) into the buffer/sample solution and mix thoroughly.

(E) Measure absorbance over the linear portion of the enzyme activity curve in the spectrophotometer.

(5) A Buffer Blank containing 2.6 mL of sodium phosphate buffer, 0.3 mL of
acetylthiocholine ( 1.0 mM final concentration ), and 0.1 mL of DTNB (0.32 mM final concentration) and 0.02 mL of distilled deionized water shall be run with every batch of assays.

(6) Reporting units shall be in International Units per milliliter of sample (IU/mL).

(7) Baseline and follow up assays specified in 6728 (c)(2)(A) shall be conducted by the same laboratory method.

(8) If an assay different from that described above is used, the method shall be shown comparable with the foregoing conditions and a conversion equation prepared. Results shall be reported in International Units per mL on both the original and the converted scale. The conditions to establish comparability shall be as described below.

(A) Using personnel and procedures acceptable to the Department of Health Services (Business and Professions Code sections 1242,1243,1246,1269,2070; Health and Safety Code sections 120580, 1607), blood samples shall be collected from at least ten subjects.

(B) Blood from each subject shall be tested by serial dilution as specified in "Comparison of Acetylcholinesterase Assays Run under Conditions Specified by the Standard Ellman Method and Conditions Specified by a Commercial Cholinesterase Reagent Kit." HS-1752, July 30, 1998, Department of Pesticide Regulation, Worker Health and Safety Branch.

(C) Test dilutions shall be made at 100% and 50% of enzyme activity.

(D) Triplicate samples shall be run by both the reference and the alternative methods.

(E) Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient squared (r2) shall be at least 0.9 between results of the alternative and reference methods.

Note: Authority cited: section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

6730. Working Alone.

(a) An employee mixing, loading, or applying a pesticide in toxicity category one for production of an agricultural commodity may not work alone during daylight hours unless personal, radio, or telephone contact is made to a responsible adult at intervals not exceeding two hours.

(b) An employee mixing, loading, or applying a pesticide in toxicity category one for production of an agricultural commodity may not work alone during nighttime hours unless personal, radio, or telephone contact is made to a responsible adult at intervals not exceeding one hour.

(c) A pilot, mixer-loader, and/or flagger team shall be considered as working together. In the case of two ground applicators working in the same field, no additional person is necessary if they can see each other or each other’s application vehicles.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6732. Change Area.

For any employee who regularly handles pesticides with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING", and for all employees who handle any pesticides for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity, the employer shall assure that there is, at the place where employees end their exposure period and remove their personal protective equipment, an area where employees may change clothes and wash themselves. Clean towels, soap, and sufficient water shall be available to allow for thorough washing. The employer shall provide a clean, pesticide-free place where employees may store any personal clothing not in use while at work handling pesticides.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

6734. Handler Decontamination Facilities.

(a) The employer shall assure that sufficient water, soap and single use towels for routine washing of hands and face and for emergency eye flushing and washing of the entire body are available for employees as specified in this Section.

(1) This water shall be of a quality and temperature that will not cause illness or injury when it contacts the skin or eyes or if it is swallowed, and shall be stored separate from that used for mixing with pesticides unless the tank holding water for mixing with pesticides is equipped with appropriate valves to prevent back flow of pesticides into the water.

(2) One clean change of coveralls shall be available at each decontamination site.

(b) The decontamination site for employees handling pesticides for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity shall be at the mixing/loading site and not more than 1/4 mile (or at the nearest point of vehicular access) from other handlers, except that the decontamination site for pilots may be at the loading site regardless of distance from where the pilot is working. The decontamination site shall not be in an area being treated or under a restricted entry interval unless:

(1) The handlers for whom the site is provided are working in that area being treated or under a restricted entry interval;

(2) The soap, towels, and extra change of coveralls are in an enclosed container; and

(3) The water is running tap water or enclosed in a container.

(c) One pint of water for emergency eye flushing shall be immediately available (carried by the handler or on the vehicle or aircraft the handler is using) to each employee handling pesticides for the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity if the pesticide product labeling requires protective eyewear.

(d) The decontamination site for employees handling pesticides for uses other than the commercial or research production of an agricultural plant commodity shall be within 100 feet of the mixing/loading site when they are handling pesticides with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" on the label.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6736. Coveralls.

(a) The employer shall provide coveralls for each employee who handles any pesticide with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" on the label except as provided in 6738(h).

(b) The employer shall assure that:

(1) Employees start each work day wearing coveralls whenever they handle pesticides with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING";

(2) Employees wear coveralls whenever they handle pesticides with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" except as provided in 6738(h);

(3) Employees change out of their coveralls and wash at the end of the work day;

(4) Potentially contaminated coveralls removed at the worksite or headquarters are not taken home by employees; and

(5) Employees whose work day does not involve return to the employer’s headquarters, remove and store potentially contaminated coveralls in a sealable container outside of their own living quarters for later return to the employer.

(c) This Section does not apply to employees using fumigants unless the pesticide product labeling expressly requires the use of coveralls.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6738. Personal Protective Equipment.

(a) The employer shall:

(1) Provide all required personal protective equipment, provide for its daily inspection and cleaning (according to pesticide labeling instructions or, absent any instructions, washed in detergent and hot water), and repair or replace any worn, damaged, or heavily contaminated personal protective equipment. Leather gloves previously used to apply only aluminum phosphide or magnesium phosphide pesticides and which have been aerated for 12 hours or more shall be considered cleaned;

(2) Assure that all clean personal protective equipment, when not in use, is kept separate from personal clothing and in a pesticide free, specifically designated place;

(3) Assure that appropriate measures are taken to prevent heat related illness when necessary;

(4) Assure that personal protective equipment is used correctly for its intended purpose;

(5) Discard any absorbent materials that have been drenched or heavily contaminated with a pesticide with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING";

(6) Keep and wash potentially contaminated personal protective equipment separately from other clothing or laundry;

(7) Assure that all clean personal protective equipment is either dried thoroughly before being stored or is put in a well ventilated place to dry;

(8) Assure that personal protective equipment remains the property of the employer and that pesticide handlers are not allowed or directed to take potentially contaminated personal protective equipment into their homes;

(9) Assure that any person or firm assigned or hired to clean or repair potentially contaminated personal protective equipment is protected and informed in accordance with the requirements of Section 6744 (Equipment Maintenance).

(b) The employer shall assure that:
(1) Employees wear protective eyewear when required by pesticide product labeling (except as expressly provided in this section) or when employees are engaged in:
(A) Mixing or loading, except as provided in 6738(h);
(B) Adjusting, cleaning, or repairing mixing, loading, or application equipment that contains pesticide in hoppers, tanks, or lines;
(C) Application by hand or using hand held equipment, except when:
1. Applying vertebrate pest control baits that are placed without being propelled from application equipment;
2. Applying solid fumigants (including aluminum phosphide, magnesium phosphide, and smoke cartridges) to vertebrate burrows;
3. Baiting insect monitoring traps; or
4. Applying non-insecticidal lures.
(D) Ground application using vehicle mounted or towed equipment, except when:
1. Injecting or incorporating pesticides into soil;
2. Spray nozzles are located below the employee and the nozzles are directed downward; or
3. Working in an enclosed cab; or
(E) Flagging, except when the flagger is in an enclosed cab.

(2) Whenever protective eyewear is required, one of the following types of eyewear is worn:
(A) Safety glasses that provide front, and supplemental brow and temple protection (Common eyeglasses, including sunglasses, do not meet this requirement);
(B) Goggles;
(C) Face shield;
(D) Full face mask used in conjunction with respiratory protection; or
(E) Visor (for aircraft operation only).

(c ) The employer shall assure that:
(1) Gloves are worn when required by the pesticide product labeling (except as expressly provided in this section) or (unless the pesticide product labeling specifies that gloves must not be worn), when employees are engaged in:
(A) Mixing or loading, except as provided in 6738(h);
(B) Adjusting, cleaning or repairing contaminated mixing, loading, or application equipment; and
(C) Application by hand or using hand-held equipment, except when applying vertebrate pest control baits using long handled implements that avoid actual hand contact with the bait or potentially contaminated areas of equipment.

(2) If a specific type of glove is not specified on product labeling for the pesticide being handled, gloves made of rubber, neoprene, or other chemical resistant material that provides equivalent or better protection are used. Gloves or glove linings of leather, cotton, or other absorbent materials shall not be worn unless expressly permitted by pesticide product labeling. If chemical resistant gloves with sufficient durability and suppleness are not available, leather gloves may be worn over chemical resistant glove liners. Once leather gloves have been used for this purpose, they shall not be worn in any other situation.

(d) The employer shall assure that:

(1) When chemical resistant footwear is specified by the pesticide product labeling, one of the following types of footwear is worn:

(A) Chemical resistant shoes;

(B) Chemical resistant boots; or,

(C) Chemical resistant coverings worn over boots or shoes.

(2) For aircraft operation, chemical resistant footwear need not be worn.

(e) The employer shall assure that when chemical resistant headgear is specified by the pesticide product labeling, either a chemical resistant hood or a chemical resistant hat with a wide brim is worn. For aircraft operation, a helmet may be substituted for chemical resistant headgear.

(f) The employer shall assure that when a chemical resistant apron is specified by the pesticide product labeling, a garment that covers the front of the body from mid-chest to the knees is worn.

(g) The employer shall assure that:

(1) When pesticide product labeling or regulations specify a chemical resistant suit, waterproof or impervious pants and coat or a rain suit, a chemical resistant suit that covers the torso, head, arms, and legs is worn.

(2) If the ambient temperature exceeds 80oF during daylight hours or 85oF during nighttime hours (sunset to sunrise) pesticides requiring a chemical resistant suit are not handled by employees unless they are handled pursuant to exceptions and substitutions permitted in (h) or employees use cooled chemical resistant suits or other control methods to maintain an effective working environment at or below 80oF during daylight hours or 85oF during nighttime hours (sunset to sunrise).

(h) The following exceptions and substitutions to personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling or regulations are permitted:

(1) Persons using a closed system to handle pesticide products with the signal word "DANGER" or "WARNING" may substitute coveralls, chemical resistant gloves, and a chemical resistant apron for personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling;

(2) Persons using a closed system to handle pesticide products with the signal word "CAUTION" may substitute work clothing for personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling;

(3) Persons using a closed system that operates under positive pressure shall wear protective eyewear in addition to the personal protective equipment listed in (1) or (2). Persons using any closed system shall have all personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling immediately available for use in an emergency;

(4) Persons properly mixing pesticides packaged in water soluble packets are considered to be using a closed (mixing) system for the purposes of this subsection;

(5) Persons occupying an enclosed cab (including cockpit) may substitute work clothing for personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling. If respiratory protection is required it must be worn, except in an enclosed cockpit;

(6) Persons occupying an enclosed cab acceptable for respiratory protection may substitute work clothing for personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling;

(7) Persons working in an enclosed cab, as specified in (5) and (6), other than an aircraft, shall have all personal protective equipment required by pesticide product labeling immediately available and stored in a chemical resistant container, such as a plastic bag. Labeling-required personal protective equipment shall be worn if it is necessary to work outside the cab and contact pesticide treated surfaces in the treated area. Once personal protective equipment is worn in the treated area, it shall be removed and stored in a chemical resistant container, such as a plastic bag, before reentering the cab;

(8) A chemical resistant suit may be substituted for coveralls and/or a chemical resistant apron; and

(9) Pest control aircraft pilots are not required to wear gloves during operation but gloves shall be worn by any person entering or exiting an aircraft contaminated with pesticide residues. While in the cockpit, gloves shall be carried in a chemical resistant container, such as a plastic bag.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6739. Respiratory Protection.

(a) General Requirements.

(1) The employer shall assure that:

(A) Employees use approved respiratory equipment in compliance with this regulation when handling pesticides where respirators are required by label, restricted material permit condition, or regulation.

(2) In any workplace where respirators are required by label, restricted material permit condition, regulation, or employer, the employer shall establish a written respiratory protection program with work site-specific procedures. The program shall be updated as necessary to reflect those changes in workplace conditions that affect respirator use. The employer shall include in the program the following provisions, as applicable:

(A) Procedures for selecting respirators for use in the workplace;

(B) Medical evaluations of employees required to use respirators;

(C) Fit testing procedures for tight-fitting respirators;

(D) Procedures for proper use of respirators in routine and reasonably foreseeable emergency situations;

(E) Procedures and schedules for cleaning, disinfecting, storing, inspecting, repairing, discarding, and otherwise maintaining respirators;

(F) Procedures to ensure adequate air quality, quantity, and flow of breathing air for atmosphere-supplying respirators;

(G) Training of employees in the respiratory hazards to which they are potentially exposed during routine and emergency situations, including Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) atmospheres, if appropriate;

(H) Training of employees in the proper use of respirators, including putting on and removing them, any limitations on their use, and their maintenance; and

(I) Procedures for evaluating the effectiveness of the program pursuant to subsections (n)(1) and (2).

1. The respirator program administrator shall administer the respiratory protection program in compliance with this section.

2. The employer shall provide respirators, training, and medical evaluations at no cost to the employee.

(b) Voluntary Respirator Provision.

(1) An employer may provide respirators at the request of employees or permit employees to use their own respirators for use on a voluntary basis, if the employer determines that such respirator use will not in itself create a hazard.

(2) If the employer determines that any voluntary respirator use is permissible, the employer shall provide the respirator users with the information contained in subsection (r) and display this information alongside the display of either the Hazard Communication Information for Employees Handling Pesticides in Agricultural Settings (Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflet A-8), or Hazard Communication Information for Employees Handling Pesticides in Noncrop Settings (Pesticide Safety Information Series leaflet N-8), at a central location in the workplace.

(3) Under the employer-supplied voluntary respirator provision, the employer shall establish and implement the provisions of a written respiratory protection program necessary to ensure that any employee using a respirator voluntarily is medically able to use that respirator, and that the respirator is cleaned, stored, and maintained so that its use does not present a health hazard to the user. Employers are not required to include a written respiratory protection program for those employees whose only use of respirators involves the voluntary use of filtering facepieces (dust masks).

(A) The employer shall provide respirators, training, and medical evaluations at no cost to the employee.

(c) Selection of Respirators. The employer shall select and provide an appropriate respirator certified by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) based on the respiratory hazard(s) and relevant workplace and user factors to which the worker is exposed; and the appropriate pesticide label, restricted materials permit condition, regulation, or employer requirements, whichever is most protective.

(1) The employer shall select respirators from a sufficient number of respirator models and sizes so that the respirator is acceptable to, and correctly fits, the user.

(2) Fumigant-confining structures shall be considered IDLH atmosphere unless proven not to be by appropriate measuring devices as to that chemical. The employer shall provide the following respirators for employee use in IDLH atmospheres:

(A) A full facepiece pressure demand self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) certified by NIOSH for a minimum service life of thirty minutes, or

(B) A combination full facepiece pressure demand supplied-air respirator (SAR) with auxiliary self-contained air supply.

(C) Respirators provided only for escape from IDLH atmospheres shall be NIOSH-certified for escape from the atmosphere in which they will be used.

(d) Medical Evaluation. The employer shall ensure a medical evaluation is conducted to determine the employee’s ability to use a respirator before the employee is fit tested or required to use the respirator in the workplace. The employer may discontinue an employee’s medical evaluations when the employee is no longer required to use a respirator.

(1) Medical Evaluation Procedures.

(A) The employer shall identify a physician or other licensed health care professional (PLHCP) to perform medical evaluations using the medical questionnaire in subsection (q) or an equivalent form or an initial medical examination that obtains the same information as the medical questionnaire.

(B) The medical evaluation shall obtain the information requested by the questionnaire in subsection (q), sections 1 and 2.

(2) Follow-up Medical Examination.

(A) The employer shall ensure that a follow-up medical examination is provided when a PLHCP determines that there is a need for a follow-up medical examination.

(B) The follow-up medical examination shall include any medical tests, consultations, or diagnostic procedures that the PLHCP deems necessary to make a final determination.

(3) Administration of the Medical Questionnaire and Examinations.

(A) The medical questionnaire and examinations shall be administered confidentially during the employee’s normal working hours or

at a time and place convenient to the employee. The medical questionnaire shall be administered in a manner that ensures that the employee understands its content.

(B) The employer shall provide the employee with an opportunity to discuss the questionnaire and examination results with the PLHCP.

(4) Supplemental Information for the PLHCP.

(A) The employer shall provide the following information to the PLHCP before the PLHCP makes a recommendation concerning an employee’s ability to use a respirator:

1. The type and weight of the respirator to be used by the employee;

2. The duration and frequency of respirator use (including use for rescue and escape);

3. The expected physical work effort;

4. Additional protective clothing and equipment to be worn; and

5. Temperature and humidity extremes that may be encountered.

(B) The employer shall not be required to provide any supplemental information provided previously to the PLHCP regarding an employee for a subsequent medical evaluation if the information and the PLHCP remain the same. When the employer replaces a PLHCP, the employer shall ensure that the new PLHCP obtains the information specified in (4)(A)1-5 by having the documents transferred from the former PLHCP to the new PLHCP. Employers are not required to have employees medically reevaluated solely because a new PLHCP has been selected.

(C) The employer shall provide the PLHCP with a copy of the written respiratory protection program and a copy of this section.

(5) Medical Determination.

(A) The employer shall obtain a written medical recommendation from the PLHCP regarding the employee’s ability to use the respirator. The written medical recommendation shall be provided on the form in subsection (s) or provide substantially the same information as follows:

1. Any limitations on respirator use related to the medical condition of the employee, or relating to the workplace conditions in which the respirator will be used, including whether or not the employee is medically able to use the respirator;

2. The need, if any, for follow-up medical evaluations; and

3. A statement that the PLHCP has provided the employee with a copy of the PLHCP’s written medical recommendation.

(B) If a negative pressure respirator is to be used and the PLHCP finds a medical condition that may place the employee’s health at increased risk, the employer shall either provide a powered air purifying respirator (PAPR) provided the PLHCP’s medical evaluation finds that the employee can use such a respirator or make changes in the workplace such that respiratory protection is not required. If a subsequent medical evaluation finds that the employee is medically able to use a negative pressure respirator, then the employer shall no longer be required to provide a PAPR.

(6) Additional Medical Evaluations. The employer shall provide additional medical evaluations that comply with the requirements of this section if:

(A) An employee reports medical signs or symptoms that are related to their ability to use a respirator;

(B) A PLHCP, supervisor, or the respirator program administrator informs the employer that an employee needs to be reevaluated;

(C) Information from the respiratory protection program administrator, including observations made during fit testing and program evaluation, indicates a need for employee reevaluation; or

(D) A change occurs in workplace conditions including, but not limited to, physical work effort, protective clothing, or temperature, that may result in a substantial increase in the physiological burden placed on an employee.

(e) Fit Testing. The employer shall assure that employees using a tight-fitting facepiece respirator pass an appropriate qualitative fit test (QLFT) or quantitative fit test (QNFT).

(1) The employer shall ensure that an employee using a tight-fitting facepiece respirator is fit tested before initial use of the respirator, whenever a different respirator facepiece (size, style, model or make) is used, and at least annually thereafter.

(2) The employer shall conduct an additional fit test whenever the employee reports, or the employer, PLHCP, supervisor, or respirator program administrator makes visual observations of changes in the employee’s physical condition that could affect respirator fit. Such conditions include, but are not limited to, facial scarring, dental changes, cosmetic surgery, or an obvious change in body weight.

(3) If after passing a QLFT or QNFT, the employee subsequently notifies the employer, PLHCP, supervisor, or respirator program administrator that the fit of the respirator is unacceptable, the employee shall be given a reasonable opportunity to select a different respirator facepiece and to be retested.

(4) The fit test shall be administered using either the Cal/OSHA-accepted QLFT or QNFT protocols (Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144, Appendix A), or as recommended by the manufacturer of the respirator, if such recommendations are in accordance with Title 8 CCR section 5144, Appendix A, Part II. QLFT is acceptable for all negative-pressure tight-fitting half or full facepiece respirators used in the application of pesticides.

(5) If the fit factor, as determined through a Cal/OSHA-accepted QNFT protocol (Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144, Appendix A), is equal to or greater than 100 for tight-fitting half facepieces, or equal to or greater than 500 for tight-fitting full facepieces, the QNFT has been passed with that respirator.

(6) Fit testing of tight-fitting atmosphere-supplying respirators and tight-fitting powered air-purifying respirators shall be accomplished by performing quantitative or qualitative fit testing in the negative pressure mode, regardless of the mode of operation (negative or positive pressure) that is used for respiratory protection.

(A) Qualitative fit testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by temporarily converting the respirator user’s actual facepiece into a negative pressure respirator with appropriate filters, or by using an identical negative pressure air-purifying respirator facepiece with the same sealing surfaces as a surrogate for the atmosphere-supplying or powered air-purifying respirator facepiece.

(B) Quantitative fit testing of these respirators shall be accomplished by modifying the facepiece to allow sampling inside the facepiece in the breathing zone of the user, midway between the nose and mouth. This requirement shall be accomplished by installing a permanent sampling probe onto a surrogate facepiece, or by using a sampling adapter designed to temporarily provide a means of sampling air from inside the facepiece.

(C) Any modifications to the respirator facepiece for fit testing shall be completely removed, and the facepiece restored to NIOSH-approved configuration, before that facepiece can be used in the workplace.

(f) Facepiece Seal Protection. A respirator that requires a tight face-to-facepiece seal shall not have any interference with the establishment of this seal. The employer shall ensure that:

(1) Employees shall not wear a respirator with a tight-fitting facepiece if:

(A) Facial hair comes between the sealing surface of the facepiece and the face or interferes with valve function; or

(B) Any physical or mental condition interferes with the face-to-facepiece seal or valve function.

(2) Corrective glasses or goggles or other personal protective equipment worn by an employee do not interfere with the face-to-facepiece seal.

(3) Employees perform a user seal check each time they put on the respirator using the Cal/OSHA procedures (Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144, Appendix B-1) or procedures recommended by the respirator manufacturer that the employer demonstrates are as effective as those in the Cal/OSHA procedures when using tight-fitting respirators.

(4) Appropriate surveillance shall be maintained of work area conditions and degree of employee exposure or stress. When there is a change in work area conditions or degree of employee exposure or stress that may affect respirator effectiveness, the employer shall reevaluate the continued effectiveness of the respirator.

(5) Employees shall leave the contaminated area:

(A) To wash their faces and respirator facepieces as necessary to prevent eye or skin irritation associated with respirator use;

(B) If they detect vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or leakage of the facepiece; or

(C) To replace or adjust the respirator or the filter, cartridge, or canister elements.

(6) If the employee detects vapor or gas breakthrough, changes in breathing resistance, or leakage of the facepiece, the employer shall replace or repair the respirator before allowing the employee to return to the work area.

(g) Procedures for Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health (IDLH) Atmospheres. Fumigant-confining structures shall be considered IDLH atmosphere unless proven not to be by appropriate measuring devices. For all IDLH atmospheres, the employer shall assure that:

(1) One employee, or when needed pursuant to (2), more than one employee is located outside the IDLH atmosphere;

(2) Visual, voice, or signal line communication is maintained between the employee(s) in the IDLH atmosphere and the employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere;

(3) The employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere is trained and equipped to provide effective emergency rescue;

(4) The employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmosphere notifies the employer or designee, and/or calls 9-1-1 before entering the IDLH atmosphere to provide emergency rescue. Once notified, the employer or designee authorized to do so by the employer, shall provide necessary assistance appropriate to the situation; and

(5) Employee(s) located outside the IDLH atmospheres is equipped with:

(A) Pressure demand or other positive pressure self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA), or a pressure demand or other positive pressure supplied-air respirator with auxiliary SCBA; and if necessary,

(B) Appropriate retrieval equipment for removing the employee(s) who enter(s) these hazardous atmospheres where retrieval equipment would contribute to the rescue of the employee(s) and would not increase the overall risk resulting from entry.

(h) Cleaning and Disinfecting. The employer shall provide each respirator user with a respirator that is clean, sanitary, and in good working order. The employer shall ensure that respirators are cleaned and disinfected using the procedures recommended by the respirator manufacturer. If the manufacturer requires a cleaning agent that does not contain a disinfectant, the respirator components shall be disinfected with a registered disinfectant approved for such use. The employer shall assure that:

(1) Respirators issued for the exclusive use of an employee shall be cleaned and disinfected as often as necessary to be maintained in a sanitary condition.

(2) Respirators maintained for emergency use shall be cleaned and disinfected after each use.

(3) Respirators that are collected and reissued for use of any employee shall be cleaned and disinfected before reissued.

(4) Respirators are stored to protect them from damage, contamination, dust, sunlight, extreme temperatures, excessive moisture, and damaging chemicals. Respirators shall be packed or stored to prevent deformation of the facepiece and exhalation valve.

(i) Storage of Emergency Respirators. Emergency respirators shall be:

(1) Stored immediately accessible to the work area.

(2) Stored in compartments or in covers that are clearly marked as containing emergency respirators.

(3) Stored in accordance with any applicable manufacturer instructions.

(4) Stored in such a location as to be safely accessible for use if conditions develop requiring utilization of emergency respiratory protection.

(j) Inspection and Repair.

(1) The employer shall ensure that all respirators are inspected before each use and during cleaning, and that:

(A) Routine-use respirator inspections include the following:

1. A check of respirator function, tightness of connections, and the condition of the various parts including, but not limited to, the facepiece, head straps, valves, connecting tube, and cartridges, canisters or filters;

2. A check of elastomeric parts for pliability and signs of deterioration; and

3. SCBA air cylinders are checked to ensure that at least one routine use SCBA air cylinder is charged to 80 percent of the manufacturer's recommended pressure level at the beginning of the workday.

(B) Emergency-use respirators are also inspected at least monthly according to the routine-use inspection criteria, and in accordance with the manufacturer’s recommendations. For escape-only respirators, also conduct inspection before being brought into the workplace for use. For both emergency use and escape-only respirators, inspections shall include the following:

1. A check for proper function before and after each use;

2. Certify by documenting the date the inspection was performed, the name (or signature) of the person who made the inspection, the findings, required remedial action, and a serial number or other means of identifying the inspected respirator; and that this information is included on a tag or label that is attached to the storage compartment for the respirator or is kept with the respirator. This information shall be maintained until replaced following a subsequent certification;

3. A check for properly functioning SCBA regulator and warning devices; and

4. SCBA air cylinders are checked to ensure that they are maintained at 100 percent manufacturer’s recommended capacity.

(2) The employer shall ensure that respirators that fail an inspection or are otherwise found to be defective shall be removed from service, and discarded, repaired, or adjusted in accordance with the following procedures:

(A) Repairs or adjustments to respirators shall be made only by persons appropriately trained to perform such operations and shall use only the respirator manufacturer’s NIOSH-approved parts designed for the respirator;

(B) Repairs shall be made according to the manufacturer’s recommendations and specifications for the type and extent of repairs to be performed; and

(C) Reducing and admission valves, regulators, and alarms shall be adjusted or repaired only by the manufacturer or a technician trained by the manufacturer.

(k) Breathing Air Quality and Use. The employer shall ensure:

(1) Compressed breathing air suppliers meet at least the requirements for Grade D breathing air described by the Compressed Gas Association (CGA) Commodity Specification for Air, G-7.1-1997 and certify such with a Certificate of Analysis (original or copy) from the supplier.

(2) Cylinders shall be tested and maintained as prescribed in the Shipping Container Specification Regulations of the Department of Transportation (49 Code of Federal Regulation part 173 and part 178).

(3) Compressors used to supply breathing air to respirators are constructed and situated so as to conform to Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144.

(l) Identification of Filters, Cartridges, and Canisters. The employer shall ensure that all filters, cartridges and canisters used in the workplace are labeled and color-coded with the NIOSH approval label. The label shall remain legible and not be removed.

(m) Training and Information. In addition to the training requirements specified in section 6724, the employer shall ensure that:

(1) Each employee can demonstrate knowledge of at least the following:

(A) Why the respirator is necessary and how improper fit, usage, or maintenance can compromise the protective effect of the respirator;

(B) What the limitations and capabilities of the respirator are;

(C) How to use the respirator effectively in emergency situations, including situations in which the respirator malfunctions;

(D) How to inspect, put on and remove, use, and check the seals of the respirator;

(E) What the procedures are for maintenance and storage of the respirator;

(F) How to recognize medical signs and symptoms that may limit or prevent the effective use of respirators; and

(G) The general requirements of this section.

(2) Training shall be conducted in a manner that is understandable to the employee.

(3) Training is provided prior to requiring the employee to use a respirator in the workplace.

(4) A new employee who has received training within the last 12 months that addresses the elements specified in subsection

(m)(1)(A) through (G) is not required to repeat such training provided that, as required by subsection (m)(1), the employee can demonstrate knowledge of those element(s). Previous training not repeated initially by the employer must be provided no later than 12 months from the date of the previous training.

(5) Retraining shall be administered annually, and when the following situations occur:

(A) Changes in the workplace or the type of respirator render previous training obsolete;

(B) Inadequacies in the employee’s knowledge or use of the respirator indicate that the employee has not retained the requisite understanding or skill; or

(C) Any other situation arises in which retraining appears necessary to ensure safe respirator use.

(6) The basic advisory information on respirators specified in (r) is provided in any written or oral format to employees who wear respirators when such use is not required by label, restricted materials permit condition, regulation, or by the employer.

(n) Program Evaluation.

(1) The employer shall conduct evaluations of the workplace as necessary to ensure that the provisions of the current written program are being effectively implemented and that it continues to be effective as required by this section.

(2) The employer shall annually consult employees required to use respirators to assess the employees’ views on program effectiveness and to identify any problems. Any problems that are identified during this assessment shall be corrected. Factors to be assessed include, but are not limited to:

(A) Respirator fit (including the ability to use the respirator without interfering with effective workplace performance);

(B) Appropriate respirator selection for the pesticides to which the employee is exposed;

(C) Proper respirator use under the workplace conditions the employee encounters; and

(D) Proper respirator maintenance.

(3) A written record of these evaluations and consultations shall be documented and at least contain:

(A) Name of workers consulted.

(B) Date of evaluation/consultation.

(C) Description of any finding from the evaluation or consultation requiring modification of written respiratory protection program or a declaration of no findings.

(4) Any findings from either the employer evaluation or the employee consultation that necessitate the modification to the written respiratory protection program shall be implemented within 30 days from the date of the evaluation/consultation.

(o) End-of-Service Life. When air-purifying respirators are required for protection against pesticides, the employer shall ensure that air-purifying elements (or entire respirator, if disposable type) shall be replaced according to the following hierarchically arranged criteria:

(1) At the first indication of odor, taste, or irritation while in use, the respirator wearer leaves the contaminated area, adjusts the mask for fit and on returning still encounters odor, taste, or irritation. This criterion item supercedes any of the criteria listed in (2)-(6).

(2) When any End-of-Service-Life-Indicator (ESLI) indicates that the respirator has reached its end of service;

(3) All disposable filtering facepiece respirators shall be discarded at the end of the workday;

(4) According to pesticide-specific label directions/recommendations;

(5) According to pesticide-specific directions from the respirator manufacturer;

(6) Absent any pesticide-specific directions/recommendations, at the end of the day’s work period;

(p) Recordkeeping. The employer shall retain written information regarding medical recommendations, fit testing, and the respirator program.

(1) Records required by this section shall be maintained while the employee is required to use respiratory protection and for three years after the end of employment conditions requiring respiratory protection and shall be available for inspection by the employee, the Director, or commissioner.

(2) Fit testing.

(A) The employer shall establish a record of the qualitative and quantitative fit tests administered to an employee including:

1. The name or identification of the employee tested;

2. Type of fit test performed;

3. Specific make, model, style, and size of respirator tested;

4. Date of test; and

5. The pass/fail results for qualitative fit testing or the fit factor and strip chart recording or other recording of the test results for QNFTs.

(3) A written copy of the current respirator program shall be retained by the employer. Previous versions of the written respirator protection program shall be retained for three years.

(4) Written information required to be retained under this subsection shall be made available upon request to employees falling under the respiratory protection program and to the commissioner or persons designated by the Director for review and copying.

(q) Medical Evaluation Questionnaire. The completion of this form, or a form that obtains the same information as the medical questionnaire by each respirator wearing employee; and the review of the completed form by a physician or licensed health care provider, is mandatory for all employees whose work activities require the wearing of respiratory protection.

The medical evaluation questionnaire shall be administered in a manner that ensures that the employee understands the document and its content. The person administering the questionnaire shall offer to read or explain any part of the questionnaire to the employee in a language and manner the employee understands. After giving the employee the questionnaire, the person administering the questionnaire shall ask the following question of the employee: "Can you read and complete this questionnaire?" If the answer is affirmative, the employee shall be allowed to confidentially complete the questionnaire. If the answer is negative, the employer must provide either a copy of the questionnaire in a language understood by the employee or a confidential reader, in the primarily understood language of the employee.

To the employee:

Can you read (circle): Yes/No (This question to be asked orally by employer. If yes, employee may continue with answering form. If no, employer must provide a confidential reader, in the primarily understood language of the employee.)

Your employer must allow you to answer this questionnaire during normal working hours, or at a time and place that is convenient to you. To maintain your confidentiality, your employer or supervisor must not look at or review your answers, and your employer must tell you how to deliver or send this questionnaire to the health care professional who will review it.

Section 1. (Mandatory, no variance in this format allowed) Every employee who has been selected to use any type of respirator must provide the following information (please print):

1. Today’s date: ____/____/____

2. Your name: ___________________________________________________

3. Your age: _________

4. Sex (circle one): Male/Female

5. Your height: __________ ft. __________ in.

6. Your weight: ____________ lbs.

7. Your job title: _______________________________________________________

8. How can you be reached by the health care professional who reviews this questionnaire?

______________________________________________________________________

9. If by phone, the best time to call is Morning/Afternoon/Evening/Night at:

(include the area code): ___ ___ ___ -___ ___ ___-___ ___ ___ ___

10. Has your employer told you how to contact the health care professional who will review this questionnaire (circle one):

Yes/No

11. Check the type of respirator you will use (you can check more than one category):

a. N, R, or P disposable respirator (filter-mask, noncartridge type only).

b. Half-face respirator (particulate or vapor filtering or both)

c. Full-face respirator (particulate or vapor filtering or both)

d. Powered air purifying respirator (PAPR)

e. Self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)

f. Supplied air respirator (SAR)

g. Other

12. Have you worn a respirator (circle one): Yes/No

If "yes," what type(s):

a. N, R, or P disposable respirator (filter-mask, noncartridge type only).

b. Half-face respirator (particulate or vapor filtering or both)

c. Full-face respirator (particulate or vapor filtering or both)

d. Powered air purifying respirator (PAPR)

e. Self contained breathing apparatus (SCBA)

f. Supplied air respirator (SAR)

g. Other

Section 2. (Mandatory) Every employee who has been selected to use any type of respirator must answer questions 1 through 8 below (please circle "yes" or "no").

1. Do you currently smoke tobacco or have you smoked tobacco in the last month: Yes/No

2. Have you ever had any of the following conditions?

a. Seizures (fits): Yes/No

b. Allergic reactions that interfere with your breathing: Yes/No

c. Claustrophobia (fear of closed-in places): Yes/No

d. Trouble smelling odors: Yes/No/Do not know

e. Diabetes (sugar disease): Yes/No/Do not know

3. Have you ever had any of the following pulmonary or lung problems?

a. Asbestosis: Yes/No

b. Asthma: Yes/No

c. Chronic bronchitis: Yes/No

d. Emphysema: Yes/No

e. Pneumonia: Yes/No

f. Tuberculosis: Yes/No

g. Silicosis: Yes/No

h. Pneumothorax (collapsed lung): Yes/No

i. Lung cancer: Yes/No

j. Broken ribs: Yes/No

k. Any chest injuries or surgeries: Yes/No

l. Any other lung problem that you have been told about: Yes/No

4. Do you currently have any of the following symptoms of pulmonary or lung illness?

a. Shortness of breath: Yes/No

b. Shortness of breath when walking fast on level ground or walking up a slight hill or incline: Yes/No

c. Shortness of breath when walking with other people at an ordinary pace on level ground: Yes/No

d. Have to stop for breath when walking at your own pace on level ground: Yes/No

e. Shortness of breath when washing or dressing yourself: Yes/No

f. Shortness of breath that interferes with your job: Yes/No

g. Coughing that produces phlegm (thick sputum): Yes/No

h. Coughing that wakes you early in the morning: Yes/No

i. Coughing that occurs mostly when you are lying down: Yes/No

j. Coughing up blood in the last month: Yes/No

k. Wheezing: Yes/No

l. Wheezing that interferes with your job: Yes/No

m. Chest pain when you breathe deeply: Yes/No

n. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to lung problems: Yes/No

5. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart problems?

a. Heart attack: Yes/No

b. Stroke: Yes/No

c. Angina (pain in chest): Yes/No

d. Heart failure: Yes/No

e. Swelling in your legs or feet (not caused by walking): Yes/No

f. Irregular heart beat (an arrhythmia): Yes/No/Do not know.

g. High blood pressure: Yes/No/Do not know

h. Any other heart problem that you have been told about: Yes/No

6. Have you ever had any of the following cardiovascular or heart symptoms?

a. Frequent pain or tightness in your chest: Yes/No

b. Pain or tightness in your chest during physical activity: Yes/No

c. Pain or tightness in your chest that interferes with your job: Yes/No

d. In the past two years, have you noticed your heart skipping or missing a beat: Yes/No

e. Heartburn or indigestion that is not related to eating: Yes/No

f. Any other symptoms that you think may be related to heart or circulation problems: Yes/No

7. Do you currently take medication for any of the following problems?

a. Breathing or lung problems: Yes/No

b. Heart trouble: Yes/No

c. Blood pressure: Yes/No

d. Seizures (fits): Yes/No

8. If you have used a respirator, have you ever had any of the following problems?

(If you have never used a respirator, check the following space and go to question 9:)

a. Eye irritation: Yes/No

b. Skin allergies or rashes: Yes/No

c. Anxiety: Yes/No

d. General weakness or fatigue: Yes/No

e. Breathing difficulty: Yes/No

f. Any other problem that interferes with your use of a respirator: Yes/No

9. Would you like to talk to the health care professional who will review this questionnaire about your answers to this questionnaire: Yes/No

Questions 10-15 must be answered by every employee who has been selected to use either a full-facepiece respirator or a self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA). For employees who have been selected to use other types of respirators, answering these questions is voluntary.

10. Have you ever lost vision in either eye (temporarily or permanently): Yes/No

11. Do you currently have any of the following vision problems?

a. Wear contact lenses: Yes/No

b. Wear glasses: Yes/No

c. Color blind: Yes/No

d. Any other eye or vision problem: Yes/No

12. Have you ever had an injury to your ears, including a broken ear drum: Yes/No

13. Do you currently have any of the following hearing problems?

a. Difficulty hearing: Yes/No

b. Wear a hearing aid: Yes/No

c. Any other hearing or ear problem: Yes/No

14. Have you ever had a back injury: Yes/No

15. Do you currently have any of the following musculoskeletal problems?

a. Weakness in any of your arms, hands, legs, or feet: Yes/No

b. Back pain: Yes/No

c. Difficulty fully moving your arms and legs: Yes/No

d. Pain and stiffness when you lean forward or backward at the waist: Yes/No

e. Difficulty fully moving your head up or down: Yes/No

f. Difficulty fully moving your head side to side: Yes/No

g. Difficulty bending at your knees: Yes/No

h. Difficulty squatting to the ground: Yes/No

i. Difficulty climbing a flight of stairs or a ladder carrying more than 25 lbs: Yes/No

j. Any other muscle or skeletal problem that interferes with using a respirator: Yes/No

At the discretion of the PLHCP, if further information is required to ascertain the employee’s health status and suitability for wearing respiratory protection, the PLHPC may include and require the questionnaire found in Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144, Appendix C, Part B, Questions 1-19.

(r) Voluntary Respirator Provision Information. The employer shall ensure that the following information is provided to employees who voluntarily wear a respirator when not required to do so by label, restricted materials permit condition, regulation, or employer.

Information for Employees Using Respirators When Not Required By Label or Restricted Material Permit Conditions or Regulation.

Respirators are an effective method of protection against designated hazards when properly selected and worn. Respirator use, even when exposures are below the exposure limit, may provide an additional level of comfort and perceived protection for workers. However, if a respirator is used improperly or not kept clean, the respirator itself can become a hazard to the worker. Sometimes, workers may wear respirators to avoid exposures to hazards, even if the amount of hazardous substance does not exceed the limits set by OSHA standards or Department of Pesticide Regulation guidelines. If your employer provides respirators for your voluntary use, or if you provide your own respirator, you need to take certain precautions to be sure that the respirator itself does not present a hazard.

You should do the following:

1. Read and follow all instructions provided by the manufacturer on use, maintenance, cleaning and care, and warnings regarding the respirators limitations.

2. Choose respirators certified for use to protect against the contaminant of concern. NIOSH, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, certifies respirators. A label or statement of certification should appear on the respirator or respirator packaging. It will tell you what the respirator is designed for and how much it will protect you.

3. Do not wear your respirator into atmospheres containing contaminants for which your respirator is not designed to protect against. For example, a respirator designed to filter dust particles will not protect you against gases, vapors, or very small solid particles of fumes or smoke.

4. Keep track of your respirator so that you do not mistakenly use someone else’s respirator.

5. Air filtering respirators DO NOT supply oxygen. Do not use in situations where the oxygen levels are questionable or unknown.

(s) Medical Recommendation Form. A physician or other licensed health care professional’s report of evaluation and approval for respirator use must be on file with the employer before work requiring respirator use is allowed. The following or substantially similar statement from a physician is acceptable:

On ______________________, I evaluated ________________________________.

                        Date                                                                   Patient’s name

At this time there (are)/(are not) medical contraindications to the employee named above wearing a respirator while working in potential pesticide exposure environments. The patient (does)/(does not) require further medical evaluation at this time. Any restrictions to wearing a respirator or to the type of respiratory protection are given below.

_____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________________________________________

I have provided the above-named patient with a copy of this form.

______________________________            __________________

Physician                                                                 Date

INFORMATIONAL NOTE for section 6739: Employers requiring employees to enter oxygen-deficient atmospheres shall conform to respiratory protection requirements in Title 8, California Code of Regulations, section 5144. Oxygen-deficient atmospheres contain less than 19.5 percent oxygen by volume.

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code. Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

6740. Adequate Light.

Whenever natural light in a mixing/loading area is not adequate to allow an employee to read the label and work in a safe manner, artificial light shall be provided in such areas that is sufficient to perform these activities.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6742. Safe Equipment.

(a) The employer shall assure that equipment used for mixing, loading, transferring, or applying pesticides is inspected before each day of use and equipment with any safety defect is repaired or altered to remove the hazard before further use.

(b)(1) All openings on tanks used for mixing or applying pesticides shall be equipped with covers that will prevent splashes and spills.

(2) Flexible hoses carrying liquid pesticides in toxicity categories one or two under pressure shall not pass unshielded through the cockpit of an airplane or helicopter.

(3) Shut-off devices shall be installed on the exit end of all hoses carrying liquid pesticides in toxicity categories one or two from mixing tanks that are adequate to prevent splashes onto the employee doing the loading when filling operations are stopped and the filler hose is removed from the inlet to the tank of the application vehicle. As an alternative, a reversing action pump, or similar system, may be used that will empty the hose and eliminate dripping of liquid from the end of the hose when the filling operation is stopped.

(4) Each tank, with a capacity of more than 49 gallons, that is used to mix or apply any liquid mixture derived from a pesticide in toxicity categories one or two, shall have either:

(A) A properly functioning means to indicate externally the internal liquid level in the tank such as a sight gauge; or

(B) The tank or the filler hose nozzle shall have a device that will automatically stop the filling operation before the pesticide liquid mixture spills over the top.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Section 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6744. Equipment Maintenance.

Persons who own or operate pesticide mixing, loading, or application equipment shall inform each employee under their control who may be involved in the cleaning, servicing or repair of that equipment of the hazards of the pesticides that a person may encounter, and the methods of protecting against personal injury. If such cleaning, servicing or repairing is to be performed by persons not under the control of the owner or operator of the equipment, he/she shall so notify the person in charge of performing these services. Employees who clean, service, or repair mixing and application equipment shall be provided with any necessary protective equipment or clothing by their employer, and shall be instructed and supervised in the maintenance operation in a manner that will reduce work hazards.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

6746. Closed Systems.

(a) Employers shall provide closed systems for employees who mix or load liquid pesticides in toxicity category one, or load diluted liquid mixes derived from dry pesticides in toxicity category one, for the production of an agricultural commodity. No employee shall be permitted to transfer, mix, or load these pesticides except through a closed system. The system’s design and construction shall meet the director’s closed-system criteria.

(b) The requirements of this Section do not apply to:

(1) Employees who handle a total of one gallon or less of pesticides in toxicity category one per day exclusively in original containers of one gallon or less; or

(2) Regulatory personnel collecting samples of pesticides according to official sampling procedures.

 

NOTE: Authority cited: Sections 11456 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.

 

Reference: Sections 12980 and 12981, Food and Agricultural Code.